Tuesday, July 15, 2008

Schools continue improvement on Maryland School Assessment

UPDATE: HERE IS A LINK TO THE INDY ARTICLE

ALSO, AFTER REVIEWING THE SCORES MORE CLOSELY, I'M GLAD WE ARE CONTINUING TO IMPROVE, BUT....(LEAVE IT TO ME TO BE THE PARTY POOPER) OUR COUNTY AVERAGES ARE STILL BELOW THE STATE AVERAGES :)

ORIGINAL POST:
CCPS Press release

Charles County Public Schools' reading and mathematics scores on the Maryland School Assessment (MSA) continue to improve, according to results released this week by the Maryland State Department of Education. Not included in the data is information about Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP), which is expected to be completed sometime during the summer. High school data will be released later this summer.

Scores are reported for a total of 12 tests, six reading and six math, taken in April by students in grades three through eight. Scores are expressed as the percentage of CCPS students who scored at or above the proficiency levels set when the exams started in 2003.

Systemwide, the most significant gains were in reading, where increases ranged from two to 14 points across the grades. Math scores also increased at every level with the exception of fifth-grade, which dropped two-tenths of a percentage point. As a county, all grades continued to score above the yearly benchmark, or the annual measurable objective (AMO), established by the state for school systems to meet their goals by 2014.

Additionally, Charles County Public Schools (CCPS) continues to make progress on closing the achievement gap between races and socioeconomic subgroups. Since 2003, CCPS has narrowed the gap between African-American and White students' scores at each level and in each subject. The achievement gap in elementary reading has narrowed from 25.7 points in 2003 to 10.4 points in 2008; the difference in elementary math scores has narrowed from 27 points to 13.9 points; middle school reading score gaps have closed from 24.9 to 15.2 points and math score differences have lowered from 28.2 to 22.2 points. "Eliminating the achievement gap between students of different races, ethnicities and socioeconomic status is part of our mission. It is essential for all groups of students to improve for us to continue our path to becoming a top-rated school system. I am pleased that our students are improving and that the achievement gap continues to narrow. We are not where we need to be, but we are seeing progress," said Superintendent James E. Richmond.

At the middle school level, students in grades six through eight increased reading scores over last year. Sixth-graders' scores increased from 76.6 percent to 82.4 percent; seventh-grade students' scores jumped from 69 percent to 83.5 percent; and eighth-grade scores went from 70.9 percent to 74 percent. Math scores in grades six through eight also increased. Sixth-grade scores went from 73.9 to 75.4 percent; seventh-grade scores increased from 60.8 percent to 68.3 percent; and eighth-grade scores went from 57.4 percent to 60.5 percent. Reading scores increased across all elementary grades. Third graders increased scores from 78.1 percent to 81.1 percent. Fourth-grade student scores increased from 85.2 percent to 87.3 percent and fifth-grade scores jumped from 74.5 percent to 85 percent with 46.2 percent, nearly half of the fifth grade, scoring at the advanced reading level. Third and fourth graders also increased math scores. Third-grade scores rose from 74.4 percent to 79.8 percent and fourth-grade scores went from 83.6 percent to 87.7 percent. Fifth-grade scores remained about the same, dipping from 75.3 percent to 75.1 percent.

Richmond said he continues to be pleased with student progress, increases in scores and the marked improvement in the performance of students since 2003. "The continued progress of our students is a direct result of the hard work of our students and teachers in the classroom and consistent instructional programs and support. I commend all of our employees for working with all students to help them succeed."

Statewide, system, and local school data are now available on the Maryland State Department of Education's report card, www.mdreportcard.org.

The MSA exams are given to third- through eighth-grade students in reading and mathematics, as well as to high school students in English and algebra courses. This initial round of data is used to meet federal No Child Left Behind (NCLB) requirements. Under NCLB goals, all students must score at proficient levels on state tests by 2014.

In the coming months, the Maryland State Department of Education will release algebra and English II data, High School Assessment scores, AYP and attendance and graduation numbers.

NCLB charts the progress of the overall student population in the grades tested, as well as for students receiving three categories of special services: Free and/or Reduced Price Meals (FARMS), Special Education and Limited English Proficient. It also follows the success of students in five racial subgroups: American Indian/Alaskan Native, Asian/Pacific Islander, African-American, White, and Hispanic.

See all results HERE.

4 comments:

Jennifer said...

UPDATE: HERE IS A LINK TO THE INDY ARTICLE

ALSO, AFTER REVIEWING THE SCORES MORE CLOSELY, I'M GLAD WE ARE CONTINUING TO IMPROVE, BUT....(LEAVE IT TO ME TO BE THE PARTY POOPER) OUR COUNTY AVERAGES ARE STILL BELOW THE STATE AVERAGES :)

Anonymous said...

I'm glad to see the Charles County School System giving itself a pat on the back for doing what should be done. The test scores SHOULD improve every year (if you buy into the validity of the testing...but that's another rant). I'm with you Jennifer. Why are the scores lower than state average? Aren't we supposed to have ABOVE AVERAGE leadership that could help take us to the top? We sure pay him and his crew big bucks to do it. Jennifer, whenever the board evaluates the Super, don't forget that we are still below state averages. Once again, "BETTER" is not good enough!

Anonymous said...

Jennifer:

Are you going to apply for another release of the AP scores through the "freedom of information act"?

Jennifer said...

I will wait and see if staff presents all the information first. Hopefully, after last year, it will automatically be presented. If not, yes I will put in another request.