Monday, September 24, 2018

Board considers proposal to change grading policy


Charles County Public Schools (CCPS) is asking the Board of Education to consider a grading change that would standardize the scale middle and high school teachers use to determine an “F” grade.
Should the F grade scale be 0 to 59 percent or 50 to 59 percent? Currently, the answer depends on which Charles County high school a student attends. CCPS Superintendent Kimberly Hill wants a uniform grading scale for all secondary schools.
The Board will hold a Town Hall on the grading policy prior to its Oct. 22 grading policy work session. Staff will provide a brief overview at 6 p.m. Questions and comments will be accepted starting at 6:10 p.m. and the work session will follow at 7 p.m. Board meetings are held at 5980 Radio Station Road, La Plata, MD 20646.
Under consideration is the CCPS grading committee’s recommendation that the Board consider a 10-point scale, 50 to 59 percent, as the universal scale for an “F” at secondary schools. La Plata, Maurice J. McDonough and North Point high schools base an F on a numerical value of 0 to 59 percent. So do all middle schools. Henry E. Lackey High School addresses the F scale on a case-by-case basis, but for the most part, adheres to the 0 to 59 percent scale. At St. Charles, Thomas Stone and Westlake high schools, failure is indicated by an F based on 50 to 59 percent in the first three quarters and 0 to 59 percent in the fourth quarter, a practice the committee supports.
“A student should never reach a place where there is no point in doing any more work because failure is inevitable,” Deputy Superintendent Amy Hollstein said.
Committee recommendation
An instructional team presented the grading report to the Board during its September meeting. It was the second presentation to the Board, which asked for more information on the CCPS grading committee recommendation.
The committee recommended that a failing grade at the end of three quarters be based on a numerical value of 50 to 59 percent. If a student received an overall percentage lower than 50 percent at the end of the quarter, it would be converted to 50 percent. However, the committee suggested that a failing grade in the fourth quarter be based on a 0 to 59 percent scale.
Composed of 17 middle and high school teachers, vice principals, principals, content specialists and Education Association of Charles County (EACC) representatives, the committee met six times between Sept. 28, 2017, and Feb. 8, 2018. Hollstein’s charge to the committee was to recommend consistent grading guidelines across all middle and high schools. Committee members also refined the philosophy of grading, the purpose of grades and things grades should not be used for, like discipline. 
The pros and cons
Board members also asked presenters for pros and cons of changing the numerical value of an F. Opponents of the 50 to 59 percent scale say it can lead to grade inflation, lower academic standards and give students a sense of entitlement. Additionally, some Board members questioned if it dilutes accountability, removes motivation for students to work hard and creates a false picture of student abilities.
Proponents argue an F in one marking period should not doom a student to failure for the semester or year.  Basing an F on a 0-59 scale defies logic and mathematical accuracy, creating an “academic death penalty.” Grades of A, B, C and D are all based on a 10-point spread. Proponents question why the range for an F should be 60-points, instead of 10-points.
Staff members provided examples of struggling learners who, with hard work and with determination, have been able to recover their grade with the 50-59 percent rule. Chrystal Benson, CCPS student engagement officer, cited the success of using the rule at the Robert D. Stethem Educational Center. “… the 50 percent is there to give students a cushion and some hope that with hard work and determination, they can see a way out. They don’t see themselves in a hole where they can’t get out of that hole,” Benson said.
Westlake Principal Diane Roberts agreed. When teachers see a student who is struggling, she said, they look beyond the grades and to what is going on in their life. “Sometimes there is a hiccup in the first three quarters… If we can’t work for the end goal of passing that class, that student will give up and probably drop out,” Roberts said. She cited tragedies like accidents and fires that can knock a student off track emotionally and mentally. “They’re thinking about survival and not about their grades,” she said.  “When they are ready to do something, to say it is not mathematically possible for you to pass that class… that just destroys the hope of that student.”
“Using 50-59 creates a climate of hope,” Hollstein said. “If they can make a change, they get a second chance. We are all about hard work helping students to success.”
Board member response
Board members asked additional questions, requested more data and said they wanted feedback from the community before deciding. The Board directed Hill to develop a survey and a public forum opportunity to solicit public input. The school system is creating an electronic survey that will also be available in paper form at schools.
Some Board members expressed concern over creating a policy for a small number of students, diluting grades and lowering expectations. Other members said they felt the school system needs to provide equity, meet the needs of children and expressed support for adding another layer of hope through a grading policy change.
Board member Margaret Marshall acknowledged the hard work of the committee and staff, but said there is no consensus of the Board at this time. “This requires more discussion and a great deal more consideration,” she said.

Tuesday, September 11, 2018

Notes from Board of Education Meeting, 9/11/18

The Board of Education meeting on Tuesday, September 11 will be re-broadcast on Comcast Channel 96, Verizon FIOS Channel 12 and is available via webstream at http://www.ccboe.com/ . To view the full agenda and the various reports, please visit BoardDocs .
The below notes are my personal notes and are not intended to be all-inclusive or official minutes for the Board of Education meetings and are provided as a request from my supporters and the general public in a personal effort to be more transparent. Although I have diligently tried to make these notes as unbiased and accurate as possible, I am only human and do make mistakes.


Executive session – 11 a.m. 
Call to order – 1 p.m. - Pledge of Allegiance, Thomas Stone High School 
Superintendent’s update - Report

Correspondence/Board Member updates
  • McGraw - Start of school year, state board of education meeting.
  • Kelly - Start of school year, #choosekind, MABE conference, safety and security conference, Rocktoberfest
  • Marshall - attendance at first day of school, emotional
  • Abell - Thank EACC  for crab feast,  all staff and parents for a smooth first day, personally attended McDonough, JC Parks and Matthew Henson.

Education Association of Charles County update - Report

American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees update - Report

Student Board Member update - Report

Grading policy - Report
  • Abell - if we have credit and grade recovery, why do we need this also?  It seems  as though we are diluting our grades on many levels
  • Lukas - On slide 4, could we find out how many students this represents
  • Kelly - data from other counties was obtained last year; lots of options to achieve without offering a minimum grade; cannot support; cites Hogan's comments on accountability and an article about Chicago Public School System
  • Hill - no grade fixing taking place in CCPS
  • Crawford - We have supports in place already for students that need them.
  • Marshall - complex situation with very contradicting points of view.  Support total development of child, grades aren't everything.  Shouldn't be done on a case by case basis but every student is different.
  • McGraw - Some MS and HS have done this in the past and some HS currently.  Children have different needs and we need to provide equity.
  • Patel - students would not be held to a standard and some will only take advantage of a policy like this;
Opening of schools - Report

Physical rehabilitation textbooks - Report

Summer projects - Report
  • Kelly - Billingsley completion date moved to December
  • Marshall - accolades, staff appreciative of enclosures
  • Kelly - cause for delays at Billingsley; redesign and bidding process for septic 
FY 2019 Comprehensive Maintenance Plan - Report
  • Palko - work order analysis, inspection?  Depends on school
  • McGraw - impressed with new streamlined work order process
Food and nutrition services update – summer meals and free breakfast - Report
  • Charles County has over 150,000 residents.  Over 8,000 live below poverty.  Over 700 CHILDREN are homeless.
  • Summer meals program 20,921 meals served which is about 4500 meals down
  • Breakfast = over 1.8 million
  • FREE Breakfast to ALL students Oct 1-26
  • Homegrown lunch week 9/24-28
  • No fees for using My Payments Plus
  • New and improved menus and quality (frozen to fresh)
  • hydroponic gardens
Staffing update - Report
  • attended 37 job fairs at colleges; held 3 job fairs locally
  • looking to hire December graduates;  will also begin meeting with juniors at universities now and offering letters of intent, CCPS scholarship program begins...and retention of current teachers
  • MS & HS - 163 new hires; ES - 119 - see report for specific content areas and/or locations
  • 211 Females; 71 males; 163 white; 110 black; 8 other
  • Kelly - thank you for closing the loop on the communication to applicants.  Black male teachers 20 out of the 110 blacks hired.  Wants stats on certificated staff in system
Policy 3000 series  - Report
Unfinished business - None
New business
  • Intercategory budget change
Motion to approve Abell; Second by Kelly
Yes=Abell, Crawford, Kelly, Lukas, Marshall, McGraw, Palko

Future agenda items
  • Kelly - Grading Policy
  • Lukas - Cost for having athletics in the school
Public Forum – 6 p.m.
  • Deron Tross - congratulations on the start of the new school year.  Researched communications directors etc across the county.  Use of ccboe on personal social media pages is not right.  And should not be allowed to block people.  Said member who has the ccboe domain on their personal social media page, can be hacked and not secure.  urge county attorney to investigate.   
Action items
  • Minutes
Motion to approve Executive Session Minutes by Abell; Second by Kelly
Yes=Abell, Crawford, Kelly, Marshall, McGraw, Palko; Abstain=Lukas

Motion to approve Meeting Minutes by Abell; Second by Mcgraw
Yes=Abell, Crawford, Kelly, Lukas, Marshall, McGraw, Palko
  • Personnel
Motion to approve Personnel by Kelly; Second by Marshall
Yes=Abell, Crawford, Kelly, Lukas, Marshall, McGraw, Palko

  • FY 2020 CIP state and local program
Motion to approve  CIP by Kelly; Second by Lukas
Yes=Abell, Crawford, Kelly, Lukas, Marshall, McGraw, Palko
  • Recurring Resolutions: American Education Week; American Freedom Week; Black History Month; Gifted and Talented Education Month; Career and Technology Education Month; National School Counseling Week; Read Across America; Women’s History Month; Fine and Performing Arts Month; Month of the Young Child; National Student Leadership Week; Teacher Appreciation Week; Administrative Professionals Week; Child Nutrition Employee Appreciation Week; National Physical Education and Sport Week; Washington Post Principal of the Year awards program; Charles County Teacher of the Year; Washington Post Teacher of the Year awards program; Be the Difference awards program; and Employees Retirement.
Motion to approve Resolutions by McGraw; Second by Kelly
Yes=Crawford, Kelly, Lukas, Marshall, McGraw, Palko; Abstain=Abell
  • System goals
    • Marshall - concerned about the 3 in goal 1.D.
Motion to approve goals by Abell; Second by Lukas

Motion to amend 1.d to a 4 or above by Marshall; No second
FAILED

original motion
Yes=Abell, Crawford, Kelly, Lukas, McGraw, Palko; Abstain=Marshall
Adjournment 

CCPS offering free breakfast to all students next month


During the month of October, Charles County Public Schools (CCPS) will offer all students free breakfast as a jump-start to their school day. Beginning Oct. 1 and ending Oct. 26, all CCPS students can take advantage of the breakfast program to start the day with a free healthy breakfast. Items include milk, cereal, juice and fruit with an additional option of peanut butter and jelly sandwiches for high school students.
This is the third consecutive year that CCPS has celebrated the school breakfast program by providing free meals to students in October. The goal is to spread awareness of the benefits of eating breakfast and ensuring students have access to healthy meal choices.
“Our goal in offering free breakfast in October is to ensure each child has an opportunity to start the learning day off right with healthy fuel for their bodies and minds. It is our hope that breakfast is part of a child’s normal daily routine. Students have a hard time focusing when they are hungry. I am excited to be able to offer free breakfast as a model for healthy eating habits,” Superintendent of Schools Kimberly Hill said.
The CCPS school breakfast program has more than doubled since 2012. Since 2011, the system has seen an increase of nearly 1.1 million breakfasts served to students.  At the end of the 2011-2012 school year, breakfasts served totaled 947,994. At the end of the 2017-18 school year, 1.8 million breakfasts had been served.
CCPS staff attribute the increase to several factors including the expansion of breakfast offerings, opportunities for students to buy breakfast and the ability for some students to eat in the classroom. Several schools offer separate areas for students to buy breakfast, such as walk-up kiosks, or provide a second time for students to buy breakfast in the morning.  
The free breakfast offering does not include a la carte items at the middle- or high-school levels. Additionally, offerings for students that attend Maryland Meals for Achievement (MMFA) schools will not change next month. This school year, CCPS has 14 schools that participate in the MMFA program, in which federal and state funding helps to provide free breakfast to students at those schools year round.  
Menu options, including breakfast, lunch and a la carte choices, are posted on the CCPS website at http://ccboe.nutrislice.com/.
Last school year, CCPS food and nutrition services staff served more than 4.2 million breakfast and lunches to students.

Friday, September 07, 2018

Annual College Fair is September 17 at North Point High School


Charles County Public Schools is hosting its 21st annual College Fair on Monday, Sept. 17 at North Point High School in Waldorf. High school juniors and seniors who attend CCPS schools attend the fair from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. as part of their school day. The fair is open to the public from 6 to 8 p.m.
Visitors can meet and talk with representatives from more than 150 colleges and universities at the fair. CCPS students who plan to attend during the school day must submit a signed permission form to the college and career advisor at their school.
Community members can attend the fair during the public session in the evening. Two financial aid sessions will be held during the evening hours, the first at 6:15 p.m. and the second at 7:15 p.m. There is no cost to attend the fair.

Innocence Stolen: Protecting our Children Online set for Sept. 25


A free internet safety presentation for parents and teens 16 and older will be held later this month to provide information on keeping children safe on the internet.
Guest speaker Vincent DeVivo, community outreach specialist with the U.S. Attorney’s Office, District of Maryland, will present Innocence Stolen: Protecting our Children Online from 6 to 7:30 p.m. Sept. 25 at Dr. James Craik Elementary School.
The presentation will help parents learn how to protect young people from negative and criminal influences online while providing prevention and intervention strategies and internet safety resources for parents and families to use.
“Technology provides benefits, but it also presents dangers. Parents educate their children about personal safety — look both ways before you cross the street, don’t talk to strangers. We must be just as vigilant about children’s safety online where predators can take advantage of our tendencies to share our lives through GPS-tracked photos and messages,” Superintendent of Schools Kimberly Hill said. “Cyber security is a tenet of CCPS’s See Something, Say Something safety program and the Innocence Stolen presentation is one tool the school system is using to ensure our community is educated about how to protect themselves online.”
The presentation will discuss topics related to cyberbullying, internet predators, sexting and social networking. The content is not suitable for those younger than 16, according to event organizers.
“While technology is a great tool for learning and communicating, it also poses dangers that kids may be naive to,” said Charmaine Thompson, chief of instructional technology. “This presentation is a great opportunity to come and learn from a legal expert, and get tips on how to protect your children online.”
Craik is hosting the program, but it is open to the general public. Additional internet safety presentations will be held during the school year at schools around the county. Craik is at 7725 Marshall Corner Road in Pomfret.

New Elementary Instruction Website Available




New this school year for Charles County Public Schools (CCPS) parents is a website for elementary school instruction at ccboe.com. The website is available at http://www.ccboe.com/departments/instruction/.
The website features information about early childhood education, English as a Second Language (ESOL), fine arts, health and physical education, literacy, mathematics, science and social studies. The site also features information about instructional standards for elementary content areas, some of which is broken down by grade level.
The website also features information about gifted education programs and class acceleration, elementary retention procedures and resources to assist elementary school aged children with learning. Additionally, there is a directory of school system staff who oversee individual content areas within elementary education.
Elementary school instruction features evidence-based instructional practices that maintain a high level of rigor and complexity for students. Elementary school students often work in collaborative groups and participate in high-level discussions. Classroom activities and assignments encourage creativity and self-expression. As students develop skills and strategies, they apply learning and understanding in more independent activities.
For more information about the CCPS elementary instructional program, call 301-934-7332.   

Virtual Academy Registration


Charles County Public Schools (CCPS) offers high school students different options to complete graduation requirements, including attending the Virtual Academy. The academy operates out of the Robert D. Stethem Educational Center and offers courses for sophomores, juniors and seniors.
Students complete coursework both online and during face-to-face instruction. Courses are held Monday through Thursday and the Academy is open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Students are required to attend classes for five consecutive hours per day, four days per week. Interested students can apply between now and Friday, Sept. 28 to attend the Virtual Academy.
Transportation is provided for Virtual Academy students from their assigned home school. This is new for the 2018-19 school year and begins on Monday, Sept. 10. Virtual Academy students who would like to use bus transportation must take the bus to their home school, and board the Stethem shuttle bus. Virtual Academy students who ride the bus home will depart Stethem for their home schools at the 1:48 p.m. dismissal, and take a bus from their home school to their assigned residential bus stop.
The Academy is closed on Fridays and closes at 3 p.m. on all planned two-hour early dismissals days. Students must arrive by 10 a.m. on early dismissal days in order to meet the five-hour attendance requirement.
Applications must be signed by the student and parent, and requires signatures from both the school counselor and principal. Students accepted to attend the Virtual Academy must remain in the program for the entire school year. Virtual Academy students are not eligible to participate in sports or extracurricular activities at their home school.
The Academy offers 30 A-level courses through the online APEX Learning Program. Virtual Academy was piloted in CCPS during the 2016-17 school year with nearly 40 students initially enrolled. At the end of last school year, more than 160 high school students have enrolled in the Virtual Academy, with 82 students having graduated.
Virtual Academy students who meet graduation requirements receive their diplomas through their home school at the end of the school year. Virtual Academy students must remain in contact with their school counselor to ensure they are making progress toward graduation. Information and application materials are posted on the Stethem website at http://www.ccboe.com/schools/stethem/. 

Wednesday, September 05, 2018

Board of Education Agenda for 9/11/18

The Board of Education’s next monthly meeting is Tuesday, Sept. 11 at the Jesse L. Starkey Administration Building on Radio Station Road in La Plata. The public portion of the meeting begins at 12 p.m. The meeting is televised live on Comcast Channel 96 and Verizon FiOS Channel 12, and rebroadcast throughout the week.
Board meetings are streamed live on the school system website at www.ccboe.com. Select the live streaming image posted on the front page to access the meeting. The following is a tentative meeting agenda and is subject to change.
Executive session – 11 a.m. 
Call to order – 1 p.m.
Pledge of Allegiance, Thomas Stone High School 
Superintendent’s update 
Reports of officers/boards/committees
·         Correspondence/Board Member updates
·         Education Association of Charles County update
·         American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees update
·         Student Board Member update
·         Grading policy
·         Opening of schools
·         Physical rehabilitation textbooks
·         Summer projects
·         FY 2019 Comprehensive Maintenance Plan
·         Food and nutrition services update – summer meals and free breakfast
·         Staffing update
·         Policy 3000 series
Unfinished business
New business and future agenda items
·         New business
- Intercategory budget change
·         Future agenda items
Public Forum – 6 p.m.
Action items
·         Minutes
·         Personnel
·         FY 2020 CIP state and local program
·         Recurring Resolutions: American Education Week; American Freedom Week; Black History Month; Gifted and Talented Education Month; Career and Technology Education Month; National School Counseling Week; Read Across America; Women’s History Month; Fine and Performing Arts Month; Month of the Young Child; National Student Leadership Week; Teacher Appreciation Week; Administrative Professionals Week; Child Nutrition Employee Appreciation Week; National Physical Education and Sport Week; Washington Post Principal of the Year awards program; Charles County Teacher of the Year; Washington Post Teacher of the Year awards program; Be the Difference awards program; and Employees Retirement.
·         System goals
Adjournment 

CCPS and the Maryland General Assembly Student Page Program


Charles County Public Schools (CCPS) is accepting applications from high school seniors interested in participating in the Maryland General Assembly Student Page Program. Each year, CCPS selects three high school seniors and one alternate to represent the school system in the program.
Student Pages spend two nonconsecutive weeks working in either the state Senate or House of Delegates during the legislative session in Annapolis. The session runs annually from January to April. Pages will serve one week during the first eight weeks of the session, and the second week during the last five weeks.
Pages receive a $55 stipend per day and must have transportation. Duties include keeping bill books up-to-date, distributing materials on the floor to members, assisting visitors and delivering messages to members.
Interested students must meet the following qualifications:
·         Reside in Maryland and attend a Maryland public high school;
·         Registered as a high school senior;
·         Be at least 16 years old;
·         Provide a social security number;
·         Have an interest in government and history;
·         Demonstrate outstanding classroom performance, behavior and judgement; and
·         Be reliable and courteous.
Students must apply for program consideration and can receive an application from the program sponsor at their school. The application is also available on the Charles County Public Schools (CCPS) website at http://www.ccboe.com/images/students/StudentPageApplication.pdf .
Along with the application, students must complete an essay assignment provided by their school’s program sponsor. Completed applications and essays must be submitted by Monday, Oct. 1 to the program sponsor at their school. Program sponsors are the following CCPS social studies teachers:
·         Henry E. Lackey High School, Jonathan Webster;
·         La Plata High School, Chris Butler;
·         Maurice J. McDonough High School, Nate Mouli;
·         North Point High School, Anna Newton;
·         Charles High School, Jonathan Perry;
·         Thomas Stone High School, James Lloyd; and
·         Westlake High School, Matthew Panzarella.
A panel of CCPS staff reviews applications and essay submissions to determine finalists for the three positions, as well as the alternate. Students who are selected as finalists will interview with a panel on Thursday, Oct. 11 at the Jesse L. Starkey Administration Building.
 Additional details about the program are posted on the Maryland General Assembly website at http://dls.maryland.gov/careers/student-page-program/.

Wednesday, August 29, 2018

CCPS students continue to improve on PARCC assessments


Charles County Public Schools (CCPS) students at most grade levels improved in both mathematics and English/Language Arts on the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers (PARCC) assessments in 2018. The Maryland State Department of Education (MSDE) released local school system and school-level data today for PARCC, Maryland’s school assessments in English/Language Arts and mathematics. 
“Our teachers are focused on teaching the Maryland State Standards in an authentic and engaging way. We have made slow, steady progress on PARCC, and we use the assessment data to continue to improve instruction and student performance,” Superintendent Kimberly Hill said.
County scores, elementary schools
English/Language Arts: Overall, students in Grades 3-5 scored 42.3 percent at levels 4 and 5, up from 42 percent in 2017. Fifth-grade students scored 42.6 percent at levels 4 and 5; fourth-grade students scored 43.4 percent at levels 4 and 5; and third-grade students scored 40.7 percent at levels 4 and 5.
Mathematics: Students in Grades 3-5 maintained a 36.5 percent at levels 4 and 5, the same percentage achieved in 2017. Fifth-grade students scored 34.5 percent at levels 4 and 5; fourth-grade students scored 35.4 percent at levels 4 and 5; and third-grade students scored 39.8 percent at levels 4 and 5.
County scores, middle schools
English/Language Arts: Overall, 37.5 percent of middle school students scored at levels 4 and 5 combined, up from 35.7 in 2017. Countywide, students in eighth grade scored 36.7 percent at levels 4 and 5; students in seventh grade scored 39.6 percent at levels 4 and 5; and students in sixth grade scored 36.2 percent at levels 4 and 5.
Mathematics: Overall, 29.4 percent of middle school students earned a combined score of 4 and 5 on the mathematics assessment, up from 23.1 in 2017. Students in eighth grade taking the mathematics assessment scored 11.4 percent at levels 4 and 5; students in seventh grade scored 27.4 percent at levels 4 and 5; and students in sixth grade scored 28 percent at levels 4 and 5. Middle school students taking the PARCC Algebra I assessment scored 85.4 percent at levels 4 and 5, up from 82.7 percent in 2017.
County scores, high schools
Two PARCC assessments, Algebra I and English II, became high school graduation requirements in the 2016-17 school year.
Algebra I: Overall, 35.9 percent of high school students scored at levels 4 and 5, up from 34 in 2017.
English II: Overall high school students scored 44.4 percent at levels 4 and 5, up from 41 percent in 2017.
In 2015 Maryland implemented the new PARCC state assessments in English/Language Arts and mathematics. High school students taking Algebra I and English II are required to reach a certain proficiency level as a high school graduation requirement. The PARCC assessment scoring uses a five-point score scale set by Maryland educators and others:
·         Level 5 – Exceeded Expectations
·         Level 4 – Met Expectations
·         Level 3 – Approached Expectations
·         Level 2 – Partially Met Expectations  
·         Level 1 – Did Not Yet Meet Expectations

PARCC shows growth in student achievement over time.  For example, Hill said, parents and teachers will better be able to determine if students taking the math and reading assessments in third grade are progressing in their understanding of the subject matter when they reach fourth grade and beyond.
The pattern of raising standards and creating new assessments has been in place in Maryland since the 1980s. “While there is some good news in these results, there is still work to do to ensure all of our students achieve at the level of rigor that we expect,” Hill said.
Individual student reports are available on ParentVue. Parents who do not have access to ParentVue should contact their child’s principal to request a copy of the report.
For complete CCPS results, visit http://reportcard.msde.maryland.gov/. 

Tuesday, August 14, 2018

Notes from Board of Education Meeting, 8/14/18

The Board of Education meeting on Tuesday, August 14 will be re-broadcast on Comcast Channel 96, Verizon FIOS Channel 12 and is available via webstream at http://www.ccboe.com/ . To view the full agenda and the various reports, please visit BoardDocs .
The below notes are my personal notes and are not intended to be all-inclusive or official minutes for the Board of Education meetings and are provided as a request from my supporters and the general public in a personal effort to be more transparent. Although I have diligently tried to make these notes as unbiased and accurate as possible, I am only human and do make mistakes.


Executive session – 11 a.m. 
Call to order – 12 p.m. - Pledge of Allegiance 
Superintendent’s update - Report
 Correspondence/Board Member updates
  • McGraw - Thank you to Mr. Heim for tour of school facilities.  Science and engineering program briefing
  • Crawford - thank you to Stubblefield and O'Malley-Simpson for taking care with our minutes.
  • Kelly - Thank you for the Be the Difference ceremony.  Summer school graduation.  Watch for children and new student drivers.
  • Marshall - Excitement for the new school year.  Words of wisdom
  • Abell - Summer graduations, looking forward to the coming year
  • Palko - Be the Difference Awards, ceremony for teacher of the year candidates, shadowed Mr. Vance in Maintenance Department and Ms. Murphy in the Operations Department.  Tri-County board meeting, Calvert is not enthusiastic about meeting.  Consensus to wait until after the elections.
Education Association of Charles County update - Report
American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees update - Report
Student Board Member update - Report
Decoding dyslexia - Report
  • universal screening for all students in Kindergarten
  • County wide professional development for all SST teams; continued training throughout the year
Project status update - Report
Architect’s design presentation for Benjamin Stoddert Middle School and Eva Turner Elementary School
FY 2020 CIP State and Local Program - Report
School safety and security - Report (very good presentation, recommend watching)
  • See Something, Say Something; Handle with Care Program
  • Background checks for all volunteers too
  • online incident reporting and hotline anonymously
  • Secure entry ways completed or near completion at 9 schools
  • system safety and security upgrades and training implemented over the summer
  • New social security based back ground check.  Not all criminals are fingerprinted.
  • More intensive substitute training and onboarding process
  • updated active shooter curriculum to "option based"
  • gang intervention workgroup
  • partnerships with all first responders
  • student identification badge program and requirements
  • system-wide family reunification plan in partnership with CSM
  • continued construction and door numbering
  • Abell - thank you.  cant wait for implementation of ID badges.  What about k9's?
  • Kelly - Thank you, very busy
  • McGraw - how will information for "Handle with Care" program be disseminated
  • Crawford - impressive.  appreciate.  Charles County is taking safety seriously
  • Marshall - how  many gangs do we have.  
Recurring Resolutions: American Education Week; American Freedom Week; Be The Difference, Black History Month; Gifted and Talented Education Month; Career and Technology Education Month; National School Counseling Week; Read Across America; Women’s History Month; Fine and Performing Arts Month; Month of the Young Child; National Student Leadership Week; Teacher Appreciation Week; Administrative Professionals Week; Child Nutrition Employee Appreciation Week; National Physical Education and Sport Week; Washington Post Principal of the Year awards program; Charles County Teacher of the Year; and Washington Post Teacher of the Year awards program.
Unfinished Business - None
New Business - Intercategory budget change request - Report
Motion to approve the budget change request by Abell; Second by McGraw
Yes=Abell, Crawford, Kelly, Lukas, Marshall, McGraw, Palko

Future Agenda Items
  • McGraw - programs available now in Special Education
Public Forum – 3:30 p.m.
  • Tracey Wolff - Thank you to Abell Palko and Kelly for bringing Decoding Dyslexia forward and for your support.  Flier for presentation on Sept. 8th.
  • Maureen Mears - Decoding Dyslexia advocate.  Thank you for your support.
  • Danny Mears - student with dyslexia.  thank you
Action items
  • Minutes
Motion to approve the minutes from June board meeting by Abell; Second by Marshall
Yes=Abell, Crawford, Kelly, Lukas, Marshall, McGraw, Palko

Motion to approve the minutes from the June work session by Abell; Second by Marshall
Yes=Abell, Crawford, Kelly, Lukas, Marshall, McGraw, Palko
  • Personnel
Motion to approve personnel by McGraw; Second by Abell
Yes=Abell, Crawford, Kelly, Lukas, Marshall, McGraw, Palko
Adjournment